How to publish in groundbreaking journals

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About this video

Would you like to learn tips for writing and developing a strong narrative for your work? Do you want advice on how to prepare your manuscripts for publication in the best journal for your research? Join us for a webinar with Steve W. Cranford, Editor-in-Chief, Matter to learn techniques and strategies to set yourself up for publishing success. Dr. Cranford will share details about the growth of multidisciplinary Cell Press journals and tips on developing your manuscript and will elaborate on his experience working with researchers throughout the publishing cycle. Join this engaging webinar and get answers to your questions in the Q&A session. Don’t forget to extend this invitation to your colleagues who might find this of interest.

About the journal Matter:
Matter, a sister journal to Cell, is a monthly journal encompassing the general field of materials science, from nano to macro and fundamentals to application. Recognizing that materials discovery and development facilitate groundbreaking technologies bridging multiple disciplines, Matter will embrace all significant advances in materials research, encompassing the previously unknown and the innovative.

About the presenter

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Steve W. Cranford
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Editor-in-Chief, Matter

A graduate from Memorial University (Canada), Stanford University (USA), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA), Dr. Cranford was faculty at Northeastern University’s College of Engineering prior to accepting a new role as editor-in-chief for Matter.
He has over 50 publications in the field of materials science in a range of high-impact journals, including Nature and Advanced Materials, with expertise in the area of atomistic simulation, computational modeling, and nanomechanics, encompassing a variety of materials systems, from carbyne to copper to concrete.
He would have preferred to have published in Matter, but it didn’t exist. He constantly played with LEGO blocks as a child, likely leading to his interest in material assembly and structure.

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