19th Gender Summit - Global for SDGs

In September 2019, the Secretary General of the UN, Antonio Guterres, launched the Decade of Action plan to accelerate delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals. He urged all actors to dramatically increase the pace and scale of SDG implementation efforts. The UN 2020 SDG Progress Report has pointed to a number of problems in achieving all SDGs, referring specifically to SDG 5, the report states that: “the promise of a world in which every woman and girl enjoys full gender equality and all legal, social and economic barriers to their empowerment have been removed, remains unfulfilled”. The Gender Summit community’s concerns that the implementation of the UN SDG agenda might fail women, society and environment if the role of gender was restricted to the issues of empowerment and human rights,  was shaped during the 6th Gender Summit – Asia Pacific in Seoul, in August 2015, and expanded later during the 10 Gender Summit – Asia Pacific in Tokyo. Gender knowledge (standing for both biological and socio-cultural aspects) can greatly help verify claims of equality in SDG policies and interventions, as well as pinpoint the sources and consequences of disparities in outcomes for women and men.  The objective of GS19 is to involve expert in gender-SDG areas to identify gender knowledge that can be applied already and the knowledge that is still missing but is necessary to accelerate progress across all SDGs during the Decade of Action, ensuring that the improvement made will benefit women and men equally.

10 m
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Theme 3 Introduction

Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

The purpose of this session is to focus on the various aspects of risk-control, response and recovery in the face of a disaster, with particular focus on gendered aspects. Currently, COVID-19 is bringing about extraordinary circumstances across the globe, with heightened demand for immediate and precise action from medical and health related experts. Pandemics, natural disasters and other emergencies affect everyone, highlighting the importance of an intersectional approach that leaves no one behind.
Moderator introducing

Theme 3: 3-0 Anders Karlsson, Vice President of Global Strategic Networks, Elsevier, Japan

  • 3-1 Jemilah Mahmood, Special Advisor to the Prime Minister of Malaysia on Public Health
    Gender aspects of COVID-19 and the need for better data
  • 3-2 Rajib Shaw, Professor, Graduate School of Media and Governance in Keio University, past Executive Director of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR), Japan
    Biological Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction: Gender Implications
  • 3-3 Takako Izumi, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Japan
    Impact of COVID-19 on higher education institutions, and gender perspective in disaster response in Japan
  • 3-4 Jocalyn Clark, Executive editor at The Lancet. Adjunct Professor at University of Toronto
    Supporting the Global SDGs: Gender Equity Initiatives at The Lancet
  • 3-5 Rosemary Morgan, Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    COVID-19 & the need for gender responsive pandemic preparedness and response plans
Total Time
5+ hours
Complete
0 / 6
Language
  • English
6 modules
10 m
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Theme 3 Introduction

Dr Karlsson introduces Elsevier as a committed actor in advancing research for SDGs in its role as a science publisher and as an information analytics company.
1 h
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

COVID-19 & the need for gender responsive pandemic preparedness and response plans

Prof Morgan stresses the need for gender responsive emergency preparedness and response mechanisms.
1 h
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Supporting the Global SDGs: Gender Equity Initiatives at The Lancet

Dr Clark explains the commitment and actions taken across The Lancet group to advance gender equality.  A key driving force is The Lancet Women.
1 h
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Impact of COVID-19 on higher education institutions, and gender perspective in disaster response in Japan

Prof Izumi examines the impact of COVID-19 on higher education institutions in Japan: how well were they prepared for managing this emergency, given that most efforts have been directed at coping w
1 h
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Biological Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction: Gender Implications

Prof Shaw explains the work of the Sandai Framework which prioritises national health systems but lately expanded to add to the biological hazards the scope of other types of hazards, e.g.
1 h
Theme 3: Strengthening Science and Technology for Better Response to Societal Inequalities, Disruptions, and Emergencies

Gender aspects of COVID-19 and the need for better data

Dr Mahmood raises attention of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic: what are the gender dimensions of this crisis?